‘Caveman’ medical software could have a better chance of survival

Medical software developed to predict when a heart attack is likely to occur is coming to market.

The software, developed by Microsoft and published by researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch, could help patients make more informed decisions about when they need medical care, according to the study published online in the American Journal of Cardiology.

In a new paper, the researchers say the software could save lives.

Researchers at the university say the technology could be applied to diagnostics, health care planning and other health-related issues.

For example, the software is already used in a number of hospitals to make better decisions about the best treatments and treatments for patients, according a news release from the university.

But there are still a lot of challenges to overcome.

This is the first clinical trial of Caveman and it has not yet been approved by the Food and Drug Administration, which may lead to safety concerns for the technology.

However, the technology is already being used in some hospitals and doctors have used it in other situations.

It could help doctors make more accurate diagnoses of heart attacks, according the news release.

While the software has not been shown to be safe, it could also be useful for patients.

“This is a big step forward,” said Dr. Daniel J. Kappel, a cardiologist at the Texas Heart Institute and co-author of the study.

“It could lead to a better understanding of risk factors for future heart attacks.”

Medical software developed to predict when a heart attack is likely to occur is coming to market.The software, developed by…